CHAPTER XXVI. THE BASSET-HOUND

“The skull should be peaked like that of the Bloodhound, with the same dignity and expression, the nose black (although some of my own have white about theirs), and well flewed. For the size of the hound I think the teeth are extremely small. However, as they are not intended to destroy life, this is probably the reason.

“The ears should hang like the Bloodhound's, and are like the softest velvet drapery.

“The eyes are a deep brown, and are brimful of affection and intelligence. They are pretty deeply set, and should show a considerable haw. A Basset is one of those hounds incapable of having a wicked eye.

“The neck is long, but of great power; and in the Basset a jambes torses the flews extend very nearly down to the chest. The chest is more expansive than even in the Bulldog, and should in the Bassets a jambes torses be not more than two inches from the ground. In the case of the Bassets a jambes demi-torses and jambes droites, being generally lighter, their chests do not, of course, come so low.

“The shoulders are of great power, and terminate in the crooked feet of the Basset, which appear to be a mass of joints. The back and ribs are strong, and the former of great length.

“The stern is carried gaily, like that of hounds in general, and when the hound is on the scent of game this portion of his body gets extremely animated, and tells me, in my own hounds, when they have struck a fresh or a cold scent, and I even know when the foremost hound will give tongue.

“The hind-quarters are very strong and muscular, the muscles standing rigidly out down to the hocks.

“The skin is soft in the smooth haired dogs, and like that of any other hound, but in the rough variety it is like that of the Otterhound's.

“Colour, of course, is a matter of fancy, although I infinitely prefer the tricolour, which has a tan head and a black and white body.”